created by Glenn Tamashiro

Hello and welcome. This site was developed to keep you informed about the various lessons and activities that are held in our Government/Economics and Honors Government/AP Macroeconomics classes.

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Gov: SSA Frame

Framing event

We wrote our introductory paragraph and thesis statement. We identified and provided a reasonable explanation of the significance of health care in the United States. We introduced and defined most of the critical components of the health care issue or problem (who, what, when, where, why). Finally, we communicated the purpose of the paper by establishing or reframing a question or thesis.

Gov: Health Care

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Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us

When Sean Recchi, a 42-year-old from Lancaster, Ohio, was told last March that he had non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, his wife Stephanie knew she had to get him to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston. Stephanie’s father had been treated there 10 years earlier, and she and her family credited the doctors and nurses at MD Anderson with extending his life by at least eight years.

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Gov: Sick In America – part 2

    Health costs are rising faster than inflation but a few experiments show that there is a different way that reduces costs but still makes medicine good for patients. First, Stossel talks to doctors who deal directly with patients without insurance and therefore have a different relationship with their patients. These doctors answer patients’ emails give out their own cell phone numbers and work hard to cater to their patients. He also looks at new kind of medical clinic walk-in clinics in places like drugstores and grocery stores. Stossel also talks to John Mackey CEO of Whole Foods about his company’s new healthcare plan which puts employees more in control of their healthcare dollars.

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Gov: Sick In America – part 1

  Sick In America: Whose Body Is It, Anyway? John Stossel reports on socialized health care from a pro-freedom point of view. Stossel examines the insurance industry, the need for competition to create better care and innovative experiments aimed at combining lower costs with better medicine. He also argues with Michael Moore whose documentary Sicko is a scathing criticism of America’s healthcare system. To Michael Moore the insurance companies are crooks and we’d be better off in places like Cuba, Canada, France, or England – any country that offers socialized medicine. Stossel interviews Harvard Business School professor Regina Herzlinger, who takes aim at the legislative process as well as insurers and hospitals. Herzlinger tells Stossel: Healthcare is vibrant and living. It’s full of great doctors and great  hospitals and great scientists and great medicines and great technologies and it’s been killed…It’s the insurers. They have our money…It’s the hospitals. You go to a hospital you have no idea what it costs. And it’s the U.S. Congress. In countries where healthcare is free, governments deal with that increased demand for it by limiting what’s available. Government rationing healthcare in Canada is why when Karen J. went into labor with her identical quadruplets — no neonatal unit in Canada had room for her. She flew to Montana to have the babies.

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Gov: Health Care

Man Dies From Toothache Couldn’t Afford Meds

A 24-year-old Cincinnati father died from a tooth infection this week because he couldn’t afford his medication, offering a sobering reminder of the importance of oral health and the number of people without access to dental or health care.

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Tennessee Unemployed Face Few Insurance Options

Private insurance premiums for families rose nine percent this year, according to a report released last week. For families trying to survive on unemployment checks, food stamps or part-time, low-pay work, affording private insurance becomes next to impossible.

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Gov: Sick Around America – part 2

  Who is to blame for America’s healthcare mess, and how can we fix it? John Stossel examines the insurance industry the need for competition to create better care and innovative experiments aimed at combining lower costs with better medicine. He also argues with Michael Moore whose documentary Sicko is a scathing criticism of America’s healthcare system. Stossel and Moore agree that healthcare in America is sick but they have opposite prescriptions for the cure. Health costs are rising faster than inflation but a few experiments show that there is a different way that reduces costs but still makes medicine good for patients. First, Stossel talks to doctors who deal directly with patients without insurance and therefore have a different relationship with their patients. These doctors answer patients’ emails give out their own cell phone numbers and work hard to cater to their patients. He also looks at new kind of medical clinic walk-in clinics in places like drugstores and grocery stores. Stossel also talks to John Mackey CEO of Whole Foods about his company’s new healthcare plan which puts employees more in control of their healthcare dollars.

Gov: Sick Around America – part 1

   At its best, American health care can be very good. For Microsoft employee Mark and his wife Melinda, their employee health plan paid for medical bills that totaled between $500,000 and $1 million. But beyond large, high-wage employers like Microsoft, Frontline learns that available, affordable, adequate insurance is becoming hard to find. Small businesses face a very bleak outlook for finding and keeping coverage. Coverage is becoming more expensive and less comprehensive, with high deductibles, co-pays and coverage limits. Outside of employer-based health care plans, matters are even worse. Americans seeking insurance in the individual market must submit to medical underwriting, and if they have a pre-existing condition, they will likely be denied. For those Americans who find health coverage in the private market, there’s no guarantee it will protect them.

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