Gov: Judicial System Review


Gov: Presidential Campaign Review



Formal qualifications, informal qualifications, invisible primary, self announcement, campaign organization, campaign strategies, tone, themes, targeting, fundraising, hard money, soft money, McCain-Feingold Act, endorsements, 527 groups,political action committees, raise public interest, retail politics, wholesale politics, issue ads, primary election, closed primary, open primary, blanket primary, Iowa caucus, New Hampshire primary, super Tuesday, party convention, party platform, selecting vice president, general election, get out the vote, electoral college, 538 electoral vote, House of Representatives

Gov: Judicial Structure Review


State court system, federal court system, trial courts of limited jurisdiction, trial courts of general jurisdiction, intermediate courts of appeals, state supreme courts, U.S district courts, U.S. circuit courts of appeals, U.S. supreme court, special courts

Gov: Judicial System Review



State court system, federal court system, trial courts of limited jurisdiction, trial courts of general jurisdiction, intermediate courts of appeals, state supreme courts, U.S district courts, U.S. circuit courts of appeals, U.S. supreme court, special courts, judicial election, judicial appointment, merit selection, senatorial courtesy, presidential nomination, senate approval, rule of four, writ of certiorari, legal briefs, amicus curiae briefs, oral argument, judicial conference, majority opinion, dissenting opinion, concurring opinion, judicial review, judicial restraint, judicial activism.

Gov: Chapter Review



Chapters 11 and 12 review.

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Gov: Congress Lawmaking Review



The lawmaking process in Congress is fairly straightforward. It is a struggle involving many traditions, rules, and competing interests. Most measures that actually becomes law often bears little resemblance to the bill that was first introduced.

  • Standing committees and their subcommittees do most of the work of Congress. Directed by powerful committee chairs, these committees study, revise, and sometimes completely rewrite bills.
  • The majority party leaders in each chamber direct the flow of bills through the process of debate, amendment, and voting.
  • The House of Representatives, because of its large size, restricts debate. The Senate allows unlimited debate.
  • Before a bill goes to the president, both chambers must pass it in identical form.
  • The president can choose to sign a bill into law or veto it. To save a vetoed bill, both chambers of Congress must pass it again, but this time by a two-thirds majority of those present and voting.

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Gov: Lawmaking Review



Bill, Speaker of the House, Senate majority leader, caucuses, majority and minority whips, committees, subcommittees, standing committees, conference committees, select committees, joint committees, hearings, mark-ups, appropriations, earmarks, amendments, riders, report, Christmas tree bill, logrolling, filibuster, hold, cloture, voice vote, stand-up vote, roll call vote, up-and-down vote, House Rules committee, open-rule, closed-rule, President, veto, and pocket veto.

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